Girl on an Adventure column 1

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Girl on an Adventure column 1 – published in Good Magazine

By Rachel Grunwell

There’s a saying I love: Challenge yourself; Change yourself.

So in essence, by tackling scary adventures outside of your comfort zone, you can boost personal growth.

That’s my excuse for signing up for Le Race – an 100km bike ride from Christchurch to Akaroa on March 25, 2017. I was scared silly about the idea. So, of course I immediately signed myself up.I signed up a training buddy too, TV3 presenter Mike McRoberts. I figured if I trained with Mike then no one would notice how terrible I am at this sport. All eyes would be on him. Oh, and he’s also a great training buddy and top bloke, of course.

After signing up, he pointed out a small detail. “Er, neither of us have bikes Rach”. Small detail though, right?

Thankfully Mt Eden Cycles shop owner, Mark Taylor, (pictured above) came to the rescue with some loan wheels for us two crazy journalists who love scaring ourselves stupid (over things we know nothing about). Mark “fitted” me to a bike recently, which made me laugh. Here was I thinking you only get fitted for things like wedding dresses.

Rachel’s gear: Top and padded bike shorts, shoes courtesy of Specialized and a helmet courtesy of Mt Eden Cycles shop. 

 

It turns out road bikes come in nine sizes. I just told him to find me a midget-sized bike and I’d be right. But there was no getting away with that. He explains why it’s important to get the fit right. “Otherwise it could be a bit sketchy when you’re going fast down hills.” After that comment there was no further arguing from me. I prefer to keep the skin on my elbows and knees. So, he fit my midget frame to the bike frame, adjusted the seat and handlebars and then asked me to choose a colour preference in cycling helmet.

“Why bother,” I asked. “No one looks good with helmet hair anyway”. He agreed, but still asked me to please choose a colour.

“Challenge yourself; Change yourself”

I refrained from choosing the fluorescent pink helmet that caught my eye. I’m such a girlie girl, but I knew if I wore pink lycra too I’d likely resemble moving candy-floss. And remember, I want all eyes on Mike. Perhaps I could get him to choose the pink helmet…

Mark then kindly gave me some quick tips before unleashing me onto the street. He was probably worried about me crashing into someone’s parked Audi. I live in Mt Eden and so there’s a high chance of that. Perhaps I should move to another suburb?

He kindly taught me how to unclip my shoes so I can hopefully avoid “the zero mile an hour fall”. This is when riders usually stop at the lights, forget they are clipped in and then do a spectacular sideways crash – all in slow motion. So, he was kindly trying to save me from that hurt. To my body, but more importantly to the ego.

Wish me luck for my first ride. I hope you get to see a second column…

  • Column by Rachel Grunwell – Good Magazine’s wellness columnist, a keen marathoner, qualified yoga teacher and director of the InspiredHealth website.
  • Follow Rachel via Inspired Health on Facebook and Instagram.

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Training tips to get run-ready for Cigna Round the Bays

 Cigna waterfront runners pic

 By Rachel Grunwell

Now is the time to step it up for training for the annual Wellington event – Cigna Round the Bays.

The family-friendly event is 14 weeks away – on 19 February 2017 – so there is plenty of time to train well and make the most of this health journey.

This way, you’ll reach your health goal with ease and be proud of your efforts at the finish line. If you haven’t registered, then do so now so you can get the maximum health benefits from becoming a stronger runner.

There’s a distance for everyone – whether you want to walk with your baby in a buggy, do the fun run, tackle 10km, or go the distance with the mighty challenge of the Cigna Achilles Half Marathon (21km).

To help kick-start your training, I’ve listed some tips below which helped me on my run journey. They are tried and tested and I know they work.

Only a few years ago I’d puff while merely walking and pushing my youngest son in a pram, but I slowly built up my fitness with a gentle walk/run routine to now being able to run longer distances with ease. So if this mum can, you can!

TIPS FOR RUNNERS

Start with an easy walk/run around your neighbourhood for 10-20-minutes in these early weeks. Walk for two power poles, run the next two, then repeat. Over time, you will run more and walk less. Do this two or three times weekly. Keep it fun.

Don’t run too fast to avoid getting injured.

Run with good posture. A trick

is to imagine a string above your head pulling you upright.

Try to keep your arms by your

side. Flapping them wastes energy – and looks a bit uncool!

Look both ways before crossing any roads and don’t have your music up too loud. Safety is

important – and be particularly watchful if you have little ones with you.

Drink water, not sugary drinks.

Column (week 2) published in newspapers throughout Wellington.

Enter by registering HERE & join #stepitupnz.co.nz to be in to win a prize worth $2500. 

Column by Rachel Grunwell, Cigna Health and Wellbeing Ambassador – a magazine wellness columnist, runner, qualified yoga teacher and director of the InspiredHealth website. Follow Rachel via Inspired Health on Facebook and Instagram.

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Cigna Wellington Round the Bays – enter the family!

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By Rachel Grunwell

Registrations are now open for a favourite annual Wellington event – Cigna Round the Bays.

But don’t just enter yourself for race day on February 19.

Step it up by entering with friends, work colleagues and family.

Together you can support each other’s training and get fitter and healthier.

Having a specific and achievable health goal on a set date like this event can help with keeping you all motivated on your health journey.

There’s a distance for every age and level: the Mitre 10 Mega buggy walk, the 6.5km fun run or walk, Bluebridge 10km, and the Cigna/Achilles half marathon (21km).

I’m stepping it up by getting my family involved, including husband Damien, and our kids Zach, 11, Lachie, 9, and Finn, 5.

Zach is especially excited about tackling his first 10km distance alongside me.

Actually, his speedy, young legs may leave me in his dust! The rest of my whanau will do the fun run.
Damien will likely be piggy-

backing little Finn near the end. The focus for our family,

training-wise, is to keep fitness fun and at the kids’ pace.

I’ll sneak in building a base fitness with my younger kids by doing things like scooter or bike rides, family walks, light jog at the weekend and walking to school sometimes.

Zach and I are doing run training, which we will build up slowly.

Meanwhile, tell your kids they are helping you to train for the event too.

Give your kids the title of chief coach. Remember to foster a can- do mind-set, with fitness and health in general around kids and be a positive role-model on this journey.

Inspiring your kids to be fit, healthy and happy is the ultimate gift, I reckon.
Lastly, visualise the red-faced, smiling, excited faces of your loved-ones at the finish-line and a shared feeling of success.

❚ Enter by registering HERE

❚ Column published in newspapers throughout Wellington.

Column by Rachel Grunwell, Cigna Health and Wellbeing Ambassador – a runner, qualified yoga teacher and director of the InspiredHealth website. Follow more of her personal journey to get her family ready for the event on Facebook and Instagram.

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adidas boxing lesson with gold medalist David Nyika

By Rachel Grunwell

“Instead of being a big dog, be a fast cat”.

So says Commonwealth Games gold medallist David Nyika just before taking a group of “fit chick influencers” through a boxing lesson to trial the new adidas climachill gear.

I was there – and it was nice to do something different instead of running, running and more running…

Nyika shared a few gems of advice (before making us suffer in our own sweat baths). He revealed his strategy around winning. He reckons boxing, by the way, is “a super chaotic sport” and there are so many “different animals in the ring trained to do different things to you”. So to come out on top he says he becomes a “chameleon”. What he means is, he knows he’s not the biggest, strongest guy. So instead his strength is “adapting to whom I’m fighting”. So he adapts to who he faces in the ring to overcome adversity. So instead of being a big dog, he becomes that fast, light-footed cat who devours its prey and spits it out. And not just some pussy…

I loved this lesson. Adaption is important. Taking a different approach is sometimes key. Being someone, or something, that people don’t expect too keeps you one step ahead, so to speak.

Anyway, here are some pictures from that sweat bath I was talking about…

By the way Nyika told us “I don’t bite, so this should be pretty fun” before we entered the sweat bath… 

 

 

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Fast rounds of punching and then doing “combinations”… but I’m keeping my cool when the heat is on.

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Finding focus…. ten points if you can guess who I’m visualising as that poor bag #meangirl ha ha ha

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The exercises were a killer on the arms. I hope my arms will be able to move tomorrow… at least enough to lift my toothbrush.

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Game on girlfriend pow! Actually, this is the lovely Jen from transforme_nz

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Pictured here with David Nyika. Sometimes you just have to have a sneaky step up on the box so you can get (almost) to the same height as your opononent. Just saying… #shortgirl

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Who else laughs when they’re getting their ass kicked in a boxing session? Or am I alone… and weird. Maybe both. Yes, definitely both.

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Here’s some of the sweat team.

Thanks adidas.

ps thanks for the set of boxing gloves. Life can get tough; these will be very handy…

Follow Rachel via InspiredHealth on Facebook & Instagram

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Rachel is a wellness magazine columnist, Cigna wellness ambassador, multi-marathoner, qualified yoga teacher, healthy recipe creator, Goodpeoplerun ambassador, Achilles charity ambassador and adventure-seeker… 

Nutrition Tips for runners – from 3 experts

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Elite runner Ben Ruthe, pictured centre, & nutritionists Mikki Williden, left, & Sarah Sinclair, right, share top nutrition tips for runners.

 

Nutrition Tips for runners – from 3 experts

By Rachel Grunwell

What can you eat to best fuel your running?
It’s a question a lot of runners ponder. So I chatted with two qualified nutritionists who specialise in this field (who are also runners) – as well as an elite runner from the Bay of Plenty who has won some top titles.
I asked one nutritionist about what to do about the tapering period, and another about what to do on race day. While, the athlete gave his own perspective about what works best for him. He also made a good point that nutrition is an individual thing ultimately. I’ve interviewed many of the top nutritionists throughout NZ and it’s a point that these experts all hammered home too. However, here are some incredible tips and words of wisdom worth noting. I know I’ll be putting some of this great advice into action with my next event – the Rotorua Marathon on April 30 – the next major event on the NZ run calendar. Some of this advice may help you too – for any event. These experts are all awesome and I rate them all highly.

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FUEL AROUND TAPERING TIME
It’s close to tapering time for those participating in the Rotorua Marathon, like me. But use this information for any event you may have in the future. Firstly, tapering means backing off the training miles in the lead up to the race. This also means you shouldn’t be fuelling your body up as much as you might think…
It’s a “common mistake” around this time for runners to keep eating like we do while doing the big training miles.
Nutritionist Mikki Williden says it’s a real issue.
“Some people end up being heavy, lethargic and brain-fogged when they turn up to the start-line,” she says.
She knew of one guy who carb-loaded so much during a taper period that he ended up around 4kg heavier when he turned up at an event start-line.
“People overeat all the time when it comes to running,” says Williden.
So during the taper period – which can be a few weeks or as little as 10 days before an event depending on the individual – here are some of Williden’s tips:
Reduce your food intake over this time. You don’t need as much fuel because you are not using up as much energy.
2. Tap into your hunger cues; Do not eat to schedule.
3. If you suffer from nerves then reduce your vegetable intake a few days out from the event. Williden is usually an advocate of “10 serves of veg a day”, but around this time too much fibre can upset the gut and take up a lot of stomach space “which can make you feel bloated”.
4. Don’t take vast quantities of sports drinks leading up to a race. It can be too much liquid energy. “You’re better off making your own smoothies or having natural electrolytes like coconut water,” she adds.
5. Eat more frequently in the day before the event, but reduce the size of meals. This helps with having “a comfortable stomach”.

ps Williden says her favourite pre-race meals are things like Japanese (think salmon don), or a roast pork meal with kumara.

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FUEL FOR RACE DAY
Raceday nutrition is different for everyone. So what works well for one person may not work well for another. Probably the most important advice for race day, is that you should practise your own race day nutrition while doing your training runs. And it is wise to experiment with different options as it can be a matter of trial and error to pinpoint what exactly works best for you.
Sarah Sinclair, a nutritionist who specialises in nutrition for runners through her business RUNtrition, recommends eating things on race day that are “nutrient dense, with complex carbs, with healthy fats and ideally a few antioxidants to boost (think whole foods and real foods where you can). And of course drink some fluid.”
Do not eat too much prior to a race – but make sure this meal is at least 2 hours before your race/event.
Lots of people find Oats/Oatmeal or a granola works well for them, whether or not you add milk/or yoghurt is an individual thing. Some things can upset the GI tract. “Bananas are generally always safe, a piece of plain (not too fibrous) toast with banana and nut butter works well too”.

5 top tips from Sinclair:
1. Practise your nutrition strategy well ahead of race day – the before and duringfoods/fuels.
2. Prep it the night before – at 4am you don’t want to be searching around for the last scraping of peanut butter.
3. For your event fuel – always take extra, just in case – or have supporters on the course with extra.
4. Just take a sip or two of water/fluid at each drink station -you do not need to drink the whole cup, over hydration can be as dangerous as dehydration.  And if you are not gunning for a sub 1:45h in a half or 3:20 full, walk the drink stations – I promise you, you will make up the time by not choking on your water.
5. Always eat within 30 minutes of your race/event finishing to help refuel the body and ensure optimum recovery and avoid alcohol however tempting until you have fully hydrated (i.e. at least gone to the bathroom after the race/event).

Ben Ruthe headshotAn Elite Runner’s perspective:

Meanwhile, I spoke with elite runner Ben Ruthe because I knew he would give a unique opinion here – and a fresh perspective too. And he’s worth listening to because he is a gun-runner (so is his gorgeous wife too, by the way). He’s the bloke who won the Auckland Marathon in 2008 and also has six national titles to his name (under various distances), to name just only a few of his incredible accomplishments.
The Bay of Plenty based runner says he honestly eats what he craves, but avoids excessive amounts “of things that aren’t good for you”. So to decode here, he means don’t drink alcohol like you are a party-animal, and don’t consume sugar like you might if you were Charlie from Charlie and the Chocolate Factory…
Ruthe strongly advises testing out race fuels well before race day so you know if they might upset your stomach.
He recommends to keep eating the foods you usually eat close up to an event too ie don’t change things radically. He says his father-in-law Trevor Wright (who represented England at the Commonwealth Games and could run a marathon in 2:12.28) used to love steak and chips and so he continued to enjoy eating this favourite meal right up to running his events. But it’s an individual thing, he adds.
But generally his approach is quite chilled. He reckons it can affect your performance if you focus too much on everything being precise food-wise around race day. “It can knock your confidence if you get hung up on everything being perfect,” he says.
He reckons rather than focusing too much on food on race day, rather focus on “enjoying” the event…

Meanwhile, you can enter the Rotorua Marathon by clicking here

  • Rachel Grunwell is a wellbeing columnist for 2 magazines, marathoner,  yoga teacher (who specialises in ‘yoga for runners’) and blogs on Inspiredhealth.co.nz .  She’s running the Rotorua Marathon this year (her 12th marathon). Her last run-related story was on TV3 presenter Mike McRoberts set to take part in the Christchurch Marathon, which was published in newspapers nationwide & on her blog. 
  • Follow Inspired Health on Facebook (for wellbeing inspiration + health-inspired giveaways) 
  • Follow Rachel on Instagram 

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Win a Weight Watchers membership + 5 top tips for motivation while losing weight!

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Win a Weight Watchers membership + 5 top tips for motivation while losing weight!

 

By Rachel Grunwell

 

Do you want to kick some kilos? Well, it takes a lot of dedication and motivation to keep going on a weight-loss journey.

 

I get it. I’ve been there. I put on a lot of weight after I had my first child and it took a lot of strong will, and time, to keep going with my weight-loss journey. I want to share some of the things that helped me keep motivated, but also some things I’ve learnt since I became a wellbeing columnist for two magazines. Then, the cherry-on-top, is one lucky Inspired Health follower can go into the draw to win a 3 month Weight Watchers membership. How AMAZING is that! But first up, here are some tips for keeping motivated. These helped me and I hope they help you too (or please share this piece with someone you know whom it might inspire):

 

  • Think about the end goal and visualise how you will feel when you get there. For me I wanted to lose weight so I could feel happier, fitter, lighter and I dearly wanted to feel good in a pair of jeans. You know, that feeling when your legs don’t swish together anymore. Whenever you feel like reaching for a piece of cake, then remember your goal and why you started on this journey. Visualise again how you will feel when you get to that end goal.
  • If you are doing this journey alone then rope in more friends to help you with different parts of your goal. It could be a weekly walk with friends, sharing healthy recipes with another mate, or a gym session with other friends. It will make this journey more fun. And you can help encourage each other.
  • Tell your loved ones your goal. They can encourage you to keep accountable.
  • Think about a reward when you reach your goal. For me, I promised myself a beautiful pair of new jeans (no expense spared on this because I deserved it and worked sooooo hard for it). Every time I’ve worn those jeans since I smile. And yes, I still have those same jeans and I still love them. That’s the thing about a great quality designer item by the way – it lasts through fashion trends. It’s always a mini celebration when I wear them too. I’ll never forget how hard I worked to shed all that extra weight. I got to the point of wearing some size 16 clothes at the height of my pregnancy and put on close to 30kg (due to weight gain but also pre-eclampsia which cases swelling and some other more series issues if left unchecked). I’m normally a size 8. So yeah, I know what this weight loss journey thing is all about!
  • Read other inspiring stories – on Facebook, Instagram or through books even from the library. Weight Watchers has some awesome support too (more details below). The main thing is these stories and other real-life journeys will inspire you to keep going. You can also pick up tips and tricks from other inspirational people.

 

Do this journey alone if you have incredible will-power. Or if it would help to have a guide and great support, then you could try Weight Watchers like I did. Weight Watchers has recently overhauled their program and it is even better than when I used it. It now focuses on a new way of living, not a diet. It’s more of a holistic approach that incorporates good food, fitness and feeling great – it’s called Your Way. So there are lots of options to choose from to help you on your journey.

Backed by the latest science, too, the Your Way Program encourages members towards healthier eating, including more lean protein and less saturated fat and sugar.

Chicken with zucchini noodles

 

Weight Watchers also makes it easier to work fitness into your life with a new FitPoints™ system and a smartphone app. It’s an approach that’s about eating foods that fuel your health and happiness, while keeping active. The pictured chicken and zucchini noodles here is a great example of a Weight Watchers meal. Yum!

Go into the draw to win a 3 month Weight Watchers membership by finding Inspired Health (https://www.facebook.com/InspiredHealthNZ) / (https://www.instagram.com/inspiredhealthandfitness/) on Facebook or Instagram/or both, locate the promotional Win a Weight Watchers membership + 5 top tips for motivation while losing weight! post on Instagram or Facebook, and leave a comment in the ‘comments’ section of the post specifying ‘Who helps you to be the best you’. You can enter as many times as you would like! The winner will be emailed as well as announced on the Inspired Health Facebook page.

 

The winner will get access to the online community where members have help with the following:

 –          Track your food through the WW website and app, which is where you can keep an eye on your SmartPoints™.

–          Track your activity and FitPoints™ and find exercise ideas and workout plans to suit everyone.

–          Calculate SmartPoints™ for foods.

–          Access more than 3000 recipes.

–          Track your weight and milestones.

–          Be kept up to date with health trends and access motivational articles (e.g. Walk your way to slim).

–          Join the WW online Connect community, where you can chat to other members and share your successes.

(Terms and Conditions are at the end of this post)

Rachel Grunwell is a Wellness columnist for Good Magazine and also Juno Investing Magazine. She is also the director of Inspired Health where she blogs and aims to inspire Kiwis to live a life they love. She’s a keen runner and yoga teacher too.

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 “WIN A WEIGHT WATCHERS MEMBERSHIP – INSPIRED HEALTH” PROMOTION

TERMS AND CONDITIONS

(REVIEWED/REVISED BY ANISIMOFF LEGAL ON 04/04/2016)

 

  1. Information on how to enter and the prize form part of these Terms and Conditions. Participation in this promotion is deemed acceptance of these Terms and Conditions.

 

  1. The promoter is Inspired Health, 13 Essex Road, Mt Eden, 1024. Auckland, 0274064984 (“Promoter”). The prize supplier is Weight Watchers New Zealand of Level 4, Westpac Building, 79 Queen Street Auckland City 1010, telephone, (09) 573 5020 (“Weight Watchers”).

 

  1. Entry is only open to New Zealand residents aged 18 years or over who: (a) are not an existing Weight Watchers member at the time of entry or winner selection; and (b) have a valid Instagram or Facebook account. Employees (and their immediate families) of the Promoter, Weight Watchers and agencies associated with this promotion are ineligible to enter. Immediate family means any of the following: spouse, ex-spouse, de-facto spouse, child or step-child (whether natural or by adoption), parent, step-parent, grandparent, step-grandparent, uncle, aunt, niece, nephew, brother, sister, step-brother, step-sister or 1st

 

  1. Promotion commences on 04/04/2016 and ends at 11:59pm on 18/04/2016 (“Promotional Period”).

 

  1. To enter, individuals must complete one (1) the following methods during the Promotional Period:

 

Facebook Entry:

  1. visit the Inspired Health Facebook Page (http://facebook.com/InspiredHealthNZ);
  2. locate the promotional Win a Weight Watchers membership + 5 top tips for motivation while losing weight!post on the Facebook Page (“Promotional Post”); and then
  3. as a direct comment to the Promotional Post, provide an answer to the promotional question “Who helps you be the best you?” in 25 words or less;

OR

 

Instagram Entry:

  1. visit the Inspired Health Instagram Page (@inspiredhealthandfitness);
  2. locate the promotional Win a Weight Watchers membership + 5 top tips for motivation while losing weight!post on the Instagram Page (also a “Promotional Post”); and then
  3. as a direct comment to the Promotional Post, provide an answer to the promotional question “Who helps you be the best you?” in 25 words or less.

 

The public profile of the Facebook or Instagram account used to enter must contain sufficient personally identifiable information to adequately identify the entrant. Each entrant warrants to the Promoter that their entry and any other content submitted in their entry is an original creative work of the entrant that does not infringe the rights of any third party. All content must comply with and is subject to the provisions contained in clause 19.

 

  1. Incomplete or indecipherable entries will be deemed invalid.

 

  1. Multiple entries permitted, subject to the following: (a) each entry must be substantially unique; and (b) each entry must be submitted separately and in accordance with entry requirements.

 

  1. The Promoter reserves the right, at any time, to verify the validity of entries and entrants (including an entrant’s identity, age and place of residence) and reserves the right, in its sole discretion, to disqualify any individual who the Promoter has reason to believe has breached any of these Terms and Conditions, tampered with the entry process or engaged in any unlawful or other improper misconduct calculated to jeopardise fair and proper conduct of the promotion. Errors and omissions may be accepted at the Promoter’s discretion. Failure by the Promoter to enforce any of its rights at any stage does not constitute a waiver of those rights. The Promoter’s legal rights to recover damages or other compensation from such an offender are reserved.

 

  1. If there is a dispute as to the identity of an entrant, the Promoter reserves the right, in its sole discretion, to determine the identity of the entrant.

 

  1. This is a game of skill and chance plays no part in determining the winner. Each entry will be individually judged based on the originality and relevance of the answer provided to the promotional question. The judges may select additional reserve entries which they determine to be the next best, and record them in order of merit, in case of an invalid entry or ineligible entrant.

 

  1. The winner will be notified by a private message to their social media account they used to enter (i.e. Instagram or Facebook).

 

  1. The Promoter’s decision is final and no correspondence will be entered into.

 

  1. The best valid entry as determined by the judges, will win a Weight Watchers Online Coaching 3 month plan membership, valued at $107.53 NZD.

 

  1. The Weight Watchers Online Coaching 3 month plan expires 3 months from date of subscription signup date. See https://signup.weightwatchers.com.au/SignupVersions/Online/StepOne.aspx and https://www.weightwatchers.com/au/ww-subscription-agreement for details.

 

  1. If for any reason the winner does not take/redeem the prize by the time stipulated by the Promoter, then the prize will be forfeited.

 

  1. If the prize is unavailable, the Promoter, in its discretion, reserves the right to substitute the prize with a prize to the equal value and/or specification.

 

  1. Total prize pool value is $107.53 NZD.

 

  1. The prize, or any unused portion of the prize, is not transferable or exchangeable and cannot be taken as cash.

 

  1. Entrants agree that they are fully responsible for any materials they submit via the promotion including but not limited to answers to the promotional question (“Content”). The Promoter or Weight Watchers shall not be liable in any way for such Content to the full extent permitted by law. The Promoter may remove or decline to publish any Content without notice for any reason whatsoever. Entrants warrant and agree that:

 

  • they will not submit any Content that is unlawful or fraudulent, or that the Promoter may deem in breach of any intellectual property, privacy, publicity or other rights, defamatory, obscene, derogatory, pornographic, sexually inappropriate, violent, abusive, harassing, threatening, objectionable with respect to race, religion, origin or gender, not suitable for children aged under 15, or otherwise unsuitable for publication;
  • their Content shall not contain viruses or cause injury or harm to any person or entity;
  • they will obtain prior consent from any person or from the owner(s) of any property that appears in their Content;
  • the Content is the original literary work of the entrant that does not infringe the rights of any third party;
  • they consent to any use of the Content which may otherwise infringe the Content creator’s/creators’ moral rights pursuant to the Copyright Act 1968 (Cth) and warrant that they have the full authority to grant these rights; and
  • they will comply with all applicable laws and regulations, including without limitation, those governing copyright, content, defamation, privacy, publicity and the access or use of others’ computer or communication systems.

 

Without limiting any other terms herein, the entrant agrees to indemnify the Promoter and Weight Watchers for any breach of the above terms.

 

  1. As a condition of entering this promotion, each entrant licenses and grants the Promoter and Weight Watchers, their affiliates and sub-licensees a non-exclusive, royalty-free, perpetual, worldwide, irrevocable, and sub-licensable right to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish and display their entry (which shall include Content) for any purpose, including but not limited to the purposes of uploading and publicly displaying the entries, promoting this promotion, and/or any future promotional, marketing or publicity purposes, in any media, without compensation, restriction on use, attribution or liability. Entrants consent to any use of their entry which may otherwise infringe their moral rights pursuant to the Copyright Act 1968 (Cth).

 

  1. Entrants consent to the Promoter and Weight Watchers using their name, likeness, image and/or voice in the event they are a winner (including photograph, film and/or recording of the same) in any media for an unlimited period without remuneration for the purpose of promoting this promotion (including any outcome), and promoting any products manufactured, distributed and/or supplied by the Promoter and/or Weight Watchers.

 

  1. If this promotion is interfered with in any way or is not capable of being conducted as reasonably anticipated due to any reason beyond the reasonable control of the Promoter or Weight Watchers, including but not limited to technical difficulties, unauthorised intervention or fraud, the Promoter reserves the right, in its sole discretion, to the fullest extent permitted by law: (a) to disqualify any entrant; or (b) to modify, suspend, terminate or cancel the promotion, as appropriate.

 

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Nutrition Tips for runners – from 3 experts

mikkiBen Ruthe headshot  sarah sinclair

Elite runner Ben Ruthe & nutritionists Mikki Williden, left, & Sarah Sinclair, right, share top tips for runners.

 

Nutrition Tips for runners – from 3 experts

By Rachel Grunwell

What can you eat to best fuel your running?
It’s a question a lot of runners ponder. So I chatted with two qualified nutritionists who specialise in this field (who are also runners) – as well as an elite runner from the Bay of Plenty who has won some top titles.
I asked one nutritionist about what to do about the tapering period, and another about what to do on race day. While, the athlete gave his own perspective about what works best for him. He also made a good point that nutrition is an individual thing ultimately. I’ve interviewed many of the top nutritionists throughout NZ and it’s a point that these experts all hammered home too. However, here are some incredible tips and words of wisdom worth noting. I know I’ll be putting some of this great advice into action with my next event – the Rotorua Marathon on April 30 – the next major event on the NZ run calendar. Some of this advice may help you too – for any event. These experts are all awesome and I rate them all highly.

mikki

FUEL AROUND TAPERING TIME
It’s close to tapering time for those participating in the Rotorua Marathon, like me. But use this information for any event you may have in the future. Firstly, tapering means backing off the training miles in the lead up to the race. This also means you shouldn’t be fuelling your body up as much as you might think…
It’s a “common mistake” around this time for runners to keep eating like we do while doing the big training miles.
Nutritionist Mikki Williden says it’s a real issue.
“Some people end up being heavy, lethargic and brain-fogged when they turn up to the start-line,” she says.
She knew of one guy who carb-loaded so much during a taper period that he ended up around 4kg heavier when he turned up at an event start-line.
“People overeat all the time when it comes to running,” says Williden.
So during the taper period – which can be a few weeks or as little as 10 days before an event depending on the individual – here are some of Williden’s tips:
Reduce your food intake over this time. You don’t need as much fuel because you are not using up as much energy.
2. Tap into your hunger cues; Do not eat to schedule.
3. If you suffer from nerves then reduce your vegetable intake a few days out from the event. Williden is usually an advocate of “10 serves of veg a day”, but around this time too much fibre can upset the gut and take up a lot of stomach space “which can make you feel bloated”.
4. Don’t take vast quantities of sports drinks leading up to a race. It can be too much liquid energy. “You’re better off making your own smoothies or having natural electrolytes like coconut water,” she adds.
5. Eat more frequently in the day before the event, but reduce the size of meals. This helps with having “a comfortable stomach”.

ps Williden says her favourite pre-race meals are things like Japanese (think salmon don), or a roast pork meal with kumara.

sarah sinclair

 
FUEL FOR RACE DAY
Raceday nutrition is different for everyone. So what works well for one person may not work well for another. Probably the most important advice for race day, is that you should practise your own race day nutrition while doing your training runs. And it is wise to experiment with different options as it can be a matter of trial and error to pinpoint what exactly works best for you.
Sarah Sinclair, a nutritionist who specialises in nutrition for runners through her business RUNtrition, recommends eating things on race day that are “nutrient dense, with complex carbs, with healthy fats and ideally a few antioxidants to boost (think whole foods and real foods where you can). And of course drink some fluid.”
Do not eat too much prior to a race – but make sure this meal is at least 2 hours before your race/event.
Lots of people find Oats/Oatmeal or a granola works well for them, whether or not you add milk/or yoghurt is an individual thing. Some things can upset the GI tract. “Bananas are generally always safe, a piece of plain (not too fibrous) toast with banana and nut butter works well too”.

5 top tips from Sinclair:
1. Practise your nutrition strategy well ahead of race day – the before and duringfoods/fuels.
2. Prep it the night before – at 4am you don’t want to be searching around for the last scraping of peanut butter.
3. For your event fuel – always take extra, just in case – or have supporters on the course with extra.
4. Just take a sip or two of water/fluid at each drink station -you do not need to drink the whole cup, over hydration can be as dangerous as dehydration.  And if you are not gunning for a sub 1:45h in a half or 3:20 full, walk the drink stations – I promise you, you will make up the time by not choking on your water.
5. Always eat within 30 minutes of your race/event finishing to help refuel the body and ensure optimum recovery and avoid alcohol however tempting until you have fully hydrated (i.e. at least gone to the bathroom after the race/event).

Ben Ruthe headshotAn Elite Runner’s perspective:

Meanwhile, I spoke with elite runner Ben Ruthe because I knew he would give a unique opinion here – and a fresh perspective too. And he’s worth listening to because he is a gun-runner (so is his gorgeous wife too, by the way). He’s the bloke who won the Auckland Marathon in 2008 and also has six national titles to his name (under various distances), to name just only a few of his incredible accomplishments.
The Bay of Plenty based runner says he honestly eats what he craves, but avoids excessive amounts “of things that aren’t good for you”. So to decode here, he means don’t drink alcohol like you are a party-animal, and don’t consume sugar like you might if you were Charlie from Charlie and the Chocolate Factory…
Ruthe strongly advises testing out race fuels well before race day so you know if they might upset your stomach.
He recommends to keep eating the foods you usually eat close up to an event too ie don’t change things radically. He says his father-in-law Trevor Wright (who represented England at the Commonwealth Games and could run a marathon in 2:12.28) used to love steak and chips and so he continued to enjoy eating this favourite meal right up to running his events. But it’s an individual thing, he adds.
But generally his approach is quite chilled. He reckons it can affect your performance if you focus too much on everything being precise food-wise around race day. “It can knock your confidence if you get hung up on everything being perfect,” he says.
He reckons rather than focusing too much on food on race day, rather focus on “enjoying” the event…

Meanwhile, you can enter the Rotorua Marathon by clicking here

  • Rachel Grunwell is a wellbeing columnist for 2 magazines, marathoner,  yoga teacher (who specialises in ‘yoga for runners’) and blogs on Inspiredhealth.co.nz .  She’s running the Rotorua Marathon this year (her 12th marathon). Her last run-related story was on TV3 presenter Mike McRoberts set to take part in the Christchurch Marathon, which was published in newspapers nationwide & on her blog. 
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Rach 02

The Tussock Traverse – one of NZ’s most scenic courses

Tussock Traverse

By Rachel Grunwell

It’s a New Year and so it’s time for new adventures. Training for an “adventure” is a top way to keep fit.

It can also scare you out of bed in the morning to train!

A unique event (for walkers and runners) is the Tussock Traverse, one of the most scenic courses in New Zealand (on January 30). 

It’s an off-road adventure like no other.

The event showcases the eastern area of the World Heritage Tongariro National Park encompassing Tukino and the Round the Mountain and Waihohonu tracks before finishing at the majestic Chateau Tongariro in Whakapapa. 

Victory Events director Jason Cameron says most Kiwis can take part in the event. “Unlike its near neighbour the Goat, the Tussock Traverse is not highly-technical and is very achievable with its range of distance options”.

He says there’s an event option for most ages and abilities (6.5km, 13km and 26km). “It’s not highly-technical; it’s achievable”.

In the 26k expect some rock hopping through a lava field before negotiating the rolling lunar like landscape with volcanic sands through native vegetation before reaching formed tracks in the last 10km.

He says at one point in the race, entrants are “dwarfed by Mt Ngauruhoe on the right whilst capturing stunning views of Mt Ruapehu out to the left”.

Project Tongariro (formerly known as Tongariro Natural History Society) is the event’s charity partner and so entrants help give back, and conserve, the area too.

craig kirkwood

Pictured: Craig Kirkwood running in the 2015 Ironman NZ event.

One participant this year will be Craig Kirkwood, 41, an elite runner and coach from Tauranga. He “runs” Craig Kirkwood Coaching. He says this event will be “a training run” for the Tarawera Ultra 100km event on February 6.

His tips for doing the Tussock Traverse (which he came second in last year): Expect the course to feel 10% longer than running on-road, take a good quality raincoat in case the weather turns and “smile” and “enjoy it!”

* For more info check out: www.tussocktraverse.co.nz

Rach 02

Rachel is the director of inspiredhealth.co.nz/ 

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Where to get the best advice on run technique

Kelly & Rachel

By Rachel Grunwell

Obviously I’m not likely to ever run like some light-footed Kenyan athlete. They’re long-legged; I’m vertically challenged. They’ve got lightening speed genes; My ancestors preferred pints at the pub.
I ain’t a gazelle. I know that.
But even everyday runners (like me) love to strive for personal bests.
I’ve run 11 marathons, but I’d like to improve my run style. After all, I’ve only been running for a few years.
So I visit Kelly Sheerin at AUT Millennium’s running and cycling clinic on Auckland’s North Shore (pictured above). A physiotherapist and biomechanist, he analyses the science behind optimum run technique and injuries. Some top athletes seek out his advice, but also “weekend warriors” like me.
He assesses my run efficiency by putting 20 reflective markers on my lower body to measure joint angles. I’ve got 9 infrared 3D cameras watching my every move – and my form (or lack of it).

AUT Millennium pic 2

I run at different speeds on a treadmill which measures the force, and angle, at which I strike the treadmill.

Rachel running on treadmill
I then do some strength tests and he analyses all the data. The camera doesn’t lie so Kellly gets a full “picture” of my weaknesses. He tells me about things like my stride width and rate, heel whip, peak knee velocity and reveals that my gluteus medius muscles need strengthening and gives me “homework” (ie strength exercises). His technique advice is around how to optimally strike the pavement and how to position my trunk, hips and knees when I’m in motion.
It was fun being a “lab rat”. I learnt some new things about my body and what I need to do to work on running better. Information is power. Hopefully I’ll power through my next marathon. Maybe there’s a gazelle within that’s screaming to get out ha ha ha!

Meanwhile, the AUT Millennium is a very cool place. It has incredible gym and pool facilities, does some exciting research and attracts some big name athletes. While I was there I spied champion shot putter Valerie Adams pumping iron. So if you go to the gym here you can say “I work out with Valerie Adams!!” Well, you won’t quite be “training buddies”, but you do get to see her in the flesh and she’s a pretty super mighty fine cool Kiwi. A Kiwi hero.

Upstairs, is the research testing area where it’s clinically-clean (and hospital-like with all the white). There are lots of weird testing machines. There’s one room (Environmental Chamber) where athletes can practice training in hot or freezing temperatures (acclimation for overseas events). There are stationary bikes, enormous treadmills (Endurance Performance Clinic) and some weights (Strength and Conditioning Clinic). They also can do exercise testing for people at risk or living with medical conditions (Human Potential Clinic) and body composition testing (Body Composition Clinic).
Another test is lactate testing (where pin-pricks of blood are taken to measure lactic acid in the blood) as a predictor of endurance performance in events like cycling, rowing, running and triathlon style events. Plus there’s an anaerobic peak power test (a sprint test) on measuring anaerobic ability.
There’s a VO2max test too, which can reveal aerobic fitness and performance potential (or not). In other words, your ability to utilise oxygen.  For this, you run on a treadmill, while attached to a mask (which measures the volume and composition of the air breathed out) and also a heart-rate monitor.

I’ve tried this in the past. I was asked to run at progressively increasing speeds until exhaustion (think: rat on a wheel). During this, a bloke asked when I found the test fine, hard, very hard, and when I needed to stop (or I might pass out).

Through doing this I pinpointed my best training zones i.e. how fast I can run comfortably and approximate indicators of what my heart-rate should be doing during different types of training drills like interval training to endurance runs. So it’s a science-based guide to follow.

With this information, you can better tailor a training programme to suit you best.

So is this worth it? I reckon sports-mad folk will love getting science-based data to improve their performance. I want to do the lactate testing next time here – for even more accurate results. And I’m keen to try a deep water running session with Kiri Price. This is a full-body workout, I hear. It’s biomechanically the closest cross-training method to actual running (without the impact on the body).

Try it: AUT Sports Performance Clinics at AUT Millennium, 17 Antares Place, Mairangi Bay, North Shore, Auckland, www.autmillennium.org.nz

Rachel is a wellbeing columnist and healthy recipe creator for Good Magazine & Juno Investing Magazine. She writes a weekly column (on health/fitness/wellbeing etc) too for the Herald group of newspapers.

She is a marathoner, yoga teacher and director of Inspired Health

Follow Rachel on Inspired Health via Facebook and Instagram 

Rach 02

Cycling Mission for Mental Health

Auckland Detective Senior Sergeant Dave Glossop and Alison Blyth (pictured) are among a group of cyclists who rode from Bluff to Cape Reinga to raise awareness over mental health issues in NZ.

Dave Glossop

Ride Out of the Blue was a 22-day cycle mission over 28-days – and 2330km.

The journey was to highlight that 1.5 Kiwis commit suicide every day. That’s 529 lives lost in the year to June this year, according to data from the Chief Coroner.
Dave says police deal with the fallout from depression and suicide every day. He has personally witnessed too much depression and suicide in his job and this spurred him to take part in this event.
“My career has given me a heightened awareness of depression and suicide. I have witnessed the devastation of friends and relations left behind. I am particularly conscious of the suicide rate involving young people. I have wished so often I could have spoken to some of these kids before they made the choice they have. ..
“I understand the pain and the feeling that they would do anything to escape from the pain, but I wish I could explain that the pain of today will pass…”

He likens cycling to an analogy for life.
“For every up-hill there will be a down-hill. When facing a headwind it will be at your back before long. It’s easier to maintain balance if your moving forward and above all, just keep turning the peddles, keep going in the right direction and you will get to your destination,” he says.

Dave says suicide affects all ages and walks of life. He wants to help take some responsibility to protect our young. This is why he helped raise money for the mental health foundation Mindfulness in Schools. This programme gives people some tools to handle emotions from an early age, he says.

He says when Alison Blyth, who organised the first Ride out of the Blue, contacted him about the ride, “I jumped at the opportunity”. He was lucky enough to get support from his wife Nicky who has been “left carrying the can back home” and he’s thankful for work support too – and giving him leave from work.

Now, he’s just hoping he’s done enough cycle training to keep up with his crew. The group is staying at quite a few marae as they make their way up the country. On Saturday they had finished the first leg and the group stayed at the Te Whanau o Hokonui Marae in Gore. “The support is awesome,” says Dave.